Wednesday, July 26, 2017

DURANGO FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT WORK SESSION Monday, July 31, 2017 6:30 am


DURANGO FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT WORK SESSION

Monday, July 31, 2017, 6:30 am
Durango Fire Protection District
142 Sheppard Drive Durango, CO 81301


Durango Fire Protection District Board of Directors will participate in a Work
Session to discuss mill levies and impact fees 


Durango Fire Protection District

Administrative Offices Phone 970-382-6000

142 Sheppard Drive Durango, Colorado 81303 Fax 970-382-6028

www.durangofirerescue.org

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

San Juan Basin Public Health - Prevent Animal-borne (Zoonotic) Disease



As summer progresses, San Juan Basin Public Health (SJBPH) reminds community members that the risk of contracting certain animal-borne diseases increases. Zoonotic diseases are more common during warm weather months when humans and animals are frequently in close contact. 

Since the start of the year, the state has reported three hantavirus case in La Plata, Jefferson and Garfield counties, four tularemia cases in Adams, Fremont, Larimer, and Weld counties, and one case of West Nile virus in Jefferson County.

SJBPH stresses the importance of controlling the presence of rodents and mosquitoes around homes as well as wearing insect repellant and appropriate clothing when heading outdoors. Additionally, keep your pets up to date on vaccinations, and protect your pets from fleas and ticks. Do not  handle or feed wild animals, especially those that appear sick, and do not touch dead animals or animal waste. Remember to speak to your children about these precautions. 

Rabies
Rabies is an infectious viral disease that affects the nervous system of humans and other mammals. People contract rabies from the bite of a rabies-infected animal (rabid animal). If you have had a bat in your room while you were sleeping, it is important that the bat is trapped and tested for rabies. Please call SJBPH for further guidance or to report an encounter with a suspect animal.

Plague
Plague is caused by bacteria that can be transmitted to humans by the bites of infected fleas or by direct contact with infected animals. Plague is frequently detected in rock squirrels, prairie dogs, wood rats, and other species of ground squirrels and chipmunks. SJBPH investigates prairie dog population die-offs for the presence of plague. Community members can report a suspected die-off to SJBPH.

West Nile Virus
West Nile virus is carried by mosquitoes and can be passed on to humans through mosquito bites. This disease can cause encephalitis or inflammation of the brain, lining of the brain, and spinal cord. Remember to use insect repellent when going outdoors. Also, help reduce the number of mosquitos around your home by emptying standing water from flowerpots, gutters, buckets, pet water dishes, discarded tires, and birdbaths on a regular basis.

Hantavirus 
Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) is a severe, sometimes fatal, respiratory disease. Hantavirus is carried by wild rodents, particularly deer mice, and is present in their droppings, urine, and saliva. Dried droppings or urine can be stirred up in dust and humans may contract hantavirus by breathing in the contaminated air. Before cleaning up droppings, be sure to wear a mask, ventilate the room by opening windows and doors, and spray down all droppings with a bleach solution before vacuuming or sweeping.

Tularemia
Tularemia is found in the rodent rabbit populations and is transmitted by insect bites, direct transmission, or inhalation and/or ingestion of the bacteria. The infective dose is very small and can persist for long periods of time in water, soil, and carcasses. 
When mowing or landscaping:
  • Don’t mow over sick or dead animals. When possible, check the area for carcasses prior to mowing.
  • Use of masks during mowing and other landscaping activities may reduce your risk of inhaling the bacteria, but this has not been confirmed.
If you hunt, trap or skin animals:
  • Use gloves when handling animals, especially rabbits, muskrats, prairie dogs, and other rodents.
  • Cook game meat thoroughly before eating.

Tick Borne Diseases
Colorado tick fever is the most common tick-borne disease in Colorado, though most cases go unreported. It's a viral illness characterized by fever, headache, body aches, nausea, abdominal pain and lethargy. Complete recovery may take two to three weeks. The disease is not life-threatening and infection results in lifelong immunity. There's currently no preventative vaccine or effective treatment except to let the disease run its course.

Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a serious disease that's transmitted by infected Rocky Mountain wood ticks. Symptoms include sudden onset of high fever, headache, chills, and muscle aches. A rash often appears a few days later. Prompt medical attention is extremely important because Rocky Mountain spotted fever can be fatal if treatment is delayed. The illness can be cured with antibiotics.

To learn more about the symptoms, treatments, and other information for these diseases, visit http://sjbpublichealth.org/communicable-disease/. Information is also available from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment at www.colorado.gov/cdphe or Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov.

Tuesday, July 4, 2017

Smoke & Hot Spots after a Fire

Durango Fire would like to ask that community members use discretion when calling 911 for smoke and/or fire within the Lightner Creek Fire area.

It is normal for there to be hot spots, glowing spots, fire, and/or smoke within the 'black' area (within the containment lines) of a contained wildland fire. This is why containment is defined by percentage of perimeter surrounding the fire and not the percentage of area extinguished (within the containment lines).

From a preventative standpoint, It is actually better to let these areas burn to reduce the fuel load in case of a future fire in that area.  

If you are in, or near, the CR207/CR208 area you will probably be seeing more smoke and hot spots for days to come.  If you are feeling uncertain or unsafe, please call 911.  If this activity is within the containment lines, we ask that you don't call 911.  Durango Fire crews and the Type III Incident Management Team are monitoring the area for your, and the community's protection.

Monday, July 3, 2017

Lightner Creek Fire Update July 3, 2017 - 8:15 a.m.




Lightner Creek Fire Update 
July 3, 2017 - 8:00 a.m. 

Rocky Mountain Incident Management Team Black 
Shane Greer, Incident Commander 

Information Center: (970) 335-8084 
Hours of Operation: 7 a.m. - 9 p.m. 

This will be the final update for the Lightner Creek Fire from Rocky Mountain Team Black 

Current Situation: The Lightner Creek Fire is now 95 percent contained due to the continued hard work of the firefighters. The current fire size is 412 acres, however this increase from what was previously reported is due to more accurate mapping, and not an increase in perimeter growth. 
On Sunday, all remaining residents that had been evacuated were allowed to return home. The roads will remain closed to the public, and only residents with Rapid Tag cards issued from the La Plata County Sheriff’s Office will be allowed in the area. Residents can expect to continue to see firefighting resources in their community. 

On Monday, firefighters will patrol the fire’s perimeter and perform any suppression repair that is necessary. Smoke may continue to be visible at times, but is well within the controlled edge of the containment line. Excess resources will continue to be released from the fire as they complete their work. 

With the fire nearly at full containment, Rocky Mountain Team Black will transition management of the fire back to the Colorado Division of Fire Prevention and Control and the Bureau of Land Management on Tuesday morning. A type 3 incident management organization – consisting of an incident commander, one engine, and one helicopter - will continue to patrol the fire as necessary. 

Weather: The forecast calls for gusty west, northwest winds with a slight chance of thunderstorms in the afternoon. Winds are expected to be 10 to 15 mph with gusts to 20 mph. Relative humidity is expected to increase slowly through the week. 

Safety: Despite the success in containing the Lightner Creek Fire, the potential for another wildfire remains high due to dry vegetation, high temperatures, and low relative humidity. Fire officials urge homeowners living in the wildland urban interface to create defensible space around their home. Visit www.southwestcoloradofires.org/ for more information about becoming a fire adapted community. 

Closures: All recreation trails in the “Test Tracks” west of downtown Durango remain closed; including Hogsback, Leyden and Hidden Valley trails. The Bureau of Land Management and Colorado Parks and Wildlife have closures in place on public lands east of County Road 208. U.S. Forest Service trails in the Dry Fork area leaving the Colorado Trail into the above referenced closure are marked with signs indicating the fire closures in the Perins Peak area. 

Fire Restrictions: Several Fire Restrictions are in place in the area. Please visit http://www.coemergency.com/p/fire-bans-danger.html for a complete listing of fire restrictions in Colorado. 

Lightner Creek Fire 
Start Date: June 28 
InciWeb: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5298/ 
Location: 4.25 miles WNW of Durango 
Email: lightnercreekfireinfo@gmail.com 
Size: 412 acres 
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BLMMontroseFireUnit/ 
Percent Contained: 95 
Twitter: #lightnercreekfire 
Cause: Structure; spread to wildland 


### 

Sunday, July 2, 2017

Lightner Creek Fire Update July 2, 2017 - 8:30 a.m.




Lightner Creek Fire Update 
July 2, 2017 - 8:30 a.m. 

Rocky Mountain Incident Management Team Black 
Shane Greer, Incident Commander 

Information Center: (970) 335-8084 
Hours of Operation: 7 a.m. - 9 p.m. 

Current Situation: Containment of the Lightner Creek Fire has increased to 89 percent. The fire’s size has increased slightly to 406 acres. Crews were able to make excellent progress on building containment lines despite the challenging terrain. A drone flying in the fire area temporarily halted air operations on Saturday, but helicopters eventually resumed flying by the afternoon to support firefighters on the ground. On Saturday evening, residents on County Road 207, north of the intersection of County Road 207/208, were allowed to return home. Additionally, all pre-evacuation notices are now lifted. 

On Sunday, firefighters will continue to build and secure existing containment lines around the fire. Smoke may still be visible within the fire perimeter at times, and should not be a concern to residents or visitors in the area. All remaining evacuated residents will be allowed to return home as of Sunday morning. This includes residents of County Roads 207 and 208, north of U.S. Highway 160. 

Weather: The forecast calls for continued hot and dry conditions. Winds are expected to increase on Sunday, with a chance of thunderstorms in the afternoon. 

Safety: Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS), or drones, are not allowed over wildland fire operations. They pose a serious risk to pilots, firefighters, and the public. A drone can be fatal to firefighting pilots and firefighters working to suppress the fire. Unauthorized drones also disrupt and delay firefighting efforts. 

While residents may return home, County Roads 207 and 208 remain closed to the public. This remains an active fire area, with firefighting operations under way. Please do not disrupt fire operations or obstruct equipment. 

Closures: All recreation trails in the “Test Tracks” west of downtown Durango remain closed; including Hogsback, Leyden and Hidden Valley trails. The Bureau of Land Management and Colorado Parks and Wildlife have closures in place on public lands east of County Road 208. U.S. Forest Service trails in the Dry Fork area leaving the Colorado Trail into the above referenced closure are marked with signs indicating the fire closures in the Perins Peak area. 

Fire Restrictions: Several Fire Restrictions are in place in the area. Please visit http://www.coemergency.com/p/fire-bans-danger.html for a complete listing of fire restrictions in Colorado. 

Lightner Creek Fire 
Start Date: June 28 
InciWeb: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5298/ 
Location: 4.25 miles WNW of Durango 
Email: lightnercreekfireinfo@gmail.com 
Size: 406 acres F
acebook: https://www.facebook.com/BLMMontroseFireUnit/ 
Percent Contained: 89 
Twitter: #lightnercreekfire 
Cause: Structure; spread to wildland 

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Saturday, July 1, 2017

Rocky Mountain Incident Management Team - Lightner Creek Fire Update



Lightner Creek Fire Update 
July 1, 2017 - 8:30 a.m. 

Rocky Mountain Incident Management Team Black 
Shane Greer, Incident Commander 

Information Center: (970) 335-8084 
Hours of Operation: 7 a.m. - 9 p.m. 

Current Situation: Crews made excellent progress securing the western flanks of both portions of the Lightner Creek Fire (west and east of County Road 207) on Friday. Air operations supported firefighters on the ground with water drops, but no retardant was used on Friday. Handcrews will continue to secure and strengthen containment lines on Saturday, with the objective of allowing evacuated residents to return to their homes as quickly as is safe to do so. Residents and visitors may see smoke occasionally from the northeast portion of the fire on the east side of Country Road 207 as the vegetation inside the fire perimeter is consumed by the fire. This should not be a cause of concern to the public. Fire officials emphasize that the smoke visible in town is well within the perimeter of the fire. Crews are optimistic that they will be able to continue to make progress on increasing containment of the Lightner Creek Fire on Saturday. 

Weather: Sunny skies and dry weather are expected to continue. High pressure will provide relief from critical fire weather conditions of the past few days. 

Safety: Wildfire behavior is largely contingent upon weather and fuel conditions. The potential for fire activity remains high. The public is reminded to be cautious with all combustible materials to prevent unwanted, human-caused fires. Fireworks are always illegal on all public lands. 
Please remember that members of the public who illegally fly drones over or near wildfires threaten the safety of firefighters and the effectiveness of wildfire management operations. Unauthorized drones disrupted and delayed air operations on the Lightner Creek Fire during the initial response. 

Closures: County Roads 207 and 208 remain closed. All recreation trails in the “Test Tracks” west of downtown Durango are closed; including Hogsback, Leyden and Hidden Valley trails. The Bureau of Land Management and Colorado Parks and Wildlife have closures in place on public lands east of County Road 208. U.S. Forest Service trails in the Dry Fork area leaving the Colorado Trail into the above referenced closure are marked with signs indicating the fire closures in the Perins Peak area. 

Fire Restrictions: Several Fire Restrictions are in place in the area. Please visit http://www.coemergency.com/p/fire-bans-danger.html for a complete listing of fire restrictions in Colorado. 

Lightner Creek Fire 
Start Date: June 28 InciWeb: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5298/ 
Location: 4.25 miles WNW of Durango Email: lightnercreekfireinfo@gmail.com 
Size: 397 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BLMMontroseFireUnit/?fref=nf 
Percent Contained: 29 Twitter: #lightnercreekfire 
Cause: Structure; spread to wildland 

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Friday, June 30, 2017

Lightner Creek Fire Update



Lightner Creek Fire Update
June 30, 2017 - 8:30 a.m.
Rocky Mountain Incident Management Team Black
Shane Greer, Incident Commander 

Information Center: (970) 335-8084
Hours of Operation: 7 a.m. - 9 p.m.

Current Situation: There will be a community meeting Friday, June 30 at 5 p.m. at Escalante Middle School (141 Baker Lane). The team and partners will provide updates and be available to answer questions on the fire's progression, suppression actions, and plans to further contain the fire.

The Lightner Creek Fire started June 28 in a structure on private land and spread to nearby vegetation. The fire is burning on private, state, and BLM-administered lands. Several heavy air tankers, single engine air tankers and helicopters assisted and lined most of the fire east of Lightner Creek with retardant. As of Thursday evening, the fire is now estimated at 362 acres and 20 percent contained. 

Rocky Mountain Incident Management Team Black assumed command of the incident at 6 a.m. Friday, June 30. The team will continue to work closely with La Plata County, the Colorado Division of Fire Prevention and Control, the Bureau of Land Management. 
                              
La Plata County is posting community and evacuation updates at www.co.laplata.co.us.  Evacuees who need to enter closed areas on County Roads 206, 207 and 208 are asked to call the hotline at (970) 385-8700 to request a law enforcement escort to retrieve medications, pets, livestock, or campers in the Lightner Creek Campground. Scheduling will be dependent on fire conditions, and the trips will be brief.         

Weather: Breezy and dry conditions are expected to continue through Friday.

Safety: Wildfire behavior is largely contingent upon weather and fuel conditions. The potential for fire activity remains high. The public is reminded to be cautious with all combustible materials to prevent unwanted, human-caused fires.

Please remember that members of the public who illegally fly drones over or near wildfires threaten the safety of firefighters and the effectiveness of wildfire management operations. Unauthorized drones have disrupted and delayed air operations on the Lightner Creek Fire on several occasions.

ClosuresCounty Roads 206, 207 and 208 remain closed. All recreation trails in the “Test Tracks” west of downtown Durango are closed, including Hogsback, Leyden and Hidden Valley trails.
Fire Restrictions: Stage 1 Fire Restrictions are in effect on BLM-administered public lands in Archuleta, Dolores, La Plata, Montezuma, Montrose and San Miguel counties. La Plata County Board of County Commissioners enacted restrictions on open burning south of U.S. Highway 160. Stage 1 restrictions affect unincorporated private land and state land areas in La Plata County.  

Lightner Creek Fire Stats:                                                                                             
Start Date:  June 28                                          
Location:  4.24 miles NW of Durango           
Size:  362 acres                                                  
Percent Contained: 20%                                         
Cause:  Structure; spread to wildland
Twitter: #lightnercreekfire

-- 
Chris BarthFire Mitigation Specialist
BLM – Montana/Dakotas
O: (406) 896-2977
C: (406) 671-4856